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WTJU Classical Marathon 2000


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Classical Marathon 2000 - Dec 10-17


Marathon Schedule
Sun, December 10th

Mon, December 11th
Tue, December 12th
Wed, December 13th
Thu, December 14th
Fri, December 15th
Sat, December 16th
Sun, December 17th

Classical Marathon 2000 tshirt
Available for a $30 donation
Shirt color is gold.

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Welcome to the 2000 WTJU Classical Marathon. This year has been a year of transition for WTJU, during which we relocated our studios to Lambeth Commons. We invite you to tour our new facility when you stop by to pay your generous pledge of support. You can find a map to our new studios at our web site, wtju.radio.virginia.edu. We need your support more than ever, because our relocation has meant that we have assumed substantial financial obligations. WTJU has the finest facility and the best resources we have ever had to serve you, our listeners, but improvements are costly.

Our survey of classical music this year begins with the earliest of medieval music and continues all the way to the music of youthful composers who are just now beginning to make their mark in the music world. We offer a generous sampling of vocal music, from American song to William Tell. Our second opera broadcast features two Otellos, one each by two of the greatest Italian Romantic composers, Rossini and Verdi. You will hear great chamber music, some of the finest orchestral recordings ever made, and the music of Poland, France, Germany, Russia, Spain, and England. It is music of a variety to suit every palette.

You asked us for another symphonic cycle, and this year we present those of Russia’s greatest symphonist, Dmitri Shostakovich, to be heard at midnight throughout the Marathon. Unlike virtually every other radio station that plays classical music, we play entire pieces, even those that are long and often challenging. We play the great music of the Western tradition as the composer intended it to be heard, in the finest recordings available. Our commitment to you is that we are committed to the music. Enjoy and let us hear from you!

We ask for your generous financial support to make this the most successful Marathon ever. Our announcers are all volunteers, and presenting classical music on WTJU for us is a labor of love. We need your help to keep this music on the air, and we are offering some great premiums for your pledge. Without the hard work of the classical staff, the Marathon would not be possible. Special thanks are owed to all participants, especially to Winston Barham, Ralph Graves, Paul Ferrer, and Grady Lewis.

Tim Snider, Classical Director


2000 Marathon Schedule

Sun. Dec. 10:

6-10 AM: REFLECTIONS OF KEYBOARD IMPRESSIONISM

Deborah Murray and Tom Bninski

Experience the luminescent and shimmering sounds of French piano music from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Four hours of sublimely beautiful works by Debussy, Ravel, Boulanger, Satie, and others.

10-noon: BRAHMS & CO. VERSUS LISZT AND WAGNER

Andrew Pratt

Participate in the emotional tug of war between the purist "old" Romantic music of Johannes Brahms and the programmatic "new" Romantic music of Wagner and Liszt.

Noon-6 PM: WILLIAM TELL

Ann Shaffer

“William Tell” is more than just a great overture. It is romantic Italian opera at its dramatic best, featuring a high-flying tenor role that defies all but the fearless. Join Ann Shaffer as she presents one of Rossini’s greatest dramatic creations.

6-8 PM: KING OF INSTRUMENTS

Michael Latsko

Michael Latsko presents symphonic music for the reigning monarch of instruments–the mighty organ–featuring music of Copland, Jongen, and an improvised symphony in 5 movements on Christmas melodies by Gerre Hancock.

8-mid.: THE EROICA TRIO

Winston Barham

Little is ordinary about this trio of rapidly rising stars, who have wowed us for the past decade with their fearless approach to classical music. Their interests range from Albinoni to Gershwin, and they commission new music. Find out what's so special: listen and be charmed by this incredible ensemble on this special edition of Just A Few Friends.

mid.-3 AM: SHOSTAKOVICH SYMPHONIES 1, 2, & 3

Peter Knell

Our Shostakovich symphony cycle begins as the young composer demonstrates his mastery of the musical technique in these formative works.

Mon. Dec. 11:

6-10 AM: ENCORES AND PREMIERES

Ethelbert Nevin

With a particular focus on chamber and vocal music by composers including Diamond, Finzi, Moeran, Barber, Vaughan Williams, Gaubert, and Ravel, we celebrate the lyrical and the beautiful--compositions and performances that have helped to create the diverse, distinctive blend of expressions we know as "Mosaics." Plenty of flute music included.

10-noon: EMIGRES IN HOLLYWOOD

Ann Porotti

Fleeing from war and oppression, some of Europe’s finest musicians landed in Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s. Hear some of the finest creations of Rosza, Korngold, and others.

noon-2 PM: BERLIOZ AND THE FRENCH ROMANTICS

Sheila Ann Hardaway

Experience music beyond La Gloire and the French Revolution and enjoy not only the gentler side of Berlioz but also the lyrical expression of feeling achieved by Saint-Saens, Debussy, and Faure.

2-4: CARLOS KLEIBER

Brian Malone

Conductor Carlos Kleiber still fascinates: his difficult relationship with his father, his intentionally-limited repertoire, his professed dislike for conducting, his demonically fast tempi, and the way he makes an idiosyncratic interpretation sound natural. Listen to his brilliant touch with the music of Beethoven, Brahms, Wagner, the Strauss family, and others.

4-5: BBC Newshour

5-8: THE EARLY MUSIC SHOW

Colin Bird

We present a special edition of The Early Music Show, celebrating the accomplishments of such ensembles as the Clerks of Oxenford, the Tallis Scholars, the Taverner Consort, the Cardinall's Music, the Huelgas Ensemble, Fretwork, the Hilliard Ensemble, and Pomerium.

8-mid.: GREAT ORCHESTRAS, GREAT CONDUCTORS

Tim Snider and Paul Ferrer

In this special marathon Five Star Edition, we survey the great orchestras and conductors of the 1950s and 1960s–Reiner, Karajan, Bernstein, Szell, Ormandy, and more!

mid.-3 AM: SHOSTAKOVICH SYMPHONIES 4, 5, & 6

John Mitchell

Shostakovich’s style, a combination of conservative forms, contrasted with bitter resentment of Stalin’s regime, begins to emerge.

Tue. Dec. 12:

6-10 AM: IF IT ISN’T BAROQUE

Rita Barton

Enjoy works from the 15th and 16th centuries, tracing the rise of regional music and the use of imitative counterpoint in sacred and secular Renaissance music. Featured will be works by Josquin Desprez, Andrea and Giovanni Gabrieli, and more composers from the pre-Baroque era.

10-noon: CHOPIN: THE PHOENIX RISEN FROM THE ASHES

Andrew Pratt

Despite, or perhaps because of, the turmoil in his native land of Poland, Frederic Chopin came to embody the Romantic ideal of creating beauty from pathos. Listen to a selection of some of his most moving works.

noon-2 PM: THE ART OF THE ADAGIO

Bob Taibbi

It lives between the slower, often more somber world of the largo and the quicker walking pace of the andante. The adagio is where many of the most meditative and beloved melodies in the classical landscape originate. We will explore a generous sampling of the adagio.

2-4: TWO PALS FROM BROOKLYN

John Mitchell

Bernard Herrmann and Jerome Moross, two American composers with fresh voices, met in high school and remained close friends. Both wrote exciting movie, ballet, and stage music. Listen to excerpts from Herrmann's “Psycho,” “Taxi Driver,” and “Souvenir de Voyage” for clarinet and string quartet and Moross's Variations on a Waltz and Symphony No. 1.

4-5: BBC Newshour

5-8: TEACHERS AND THEIR PETS

Andrew Pratt

Follow the fertile development of the Russian Romantic idiom with an exploration of the noble lineage of the masters, from Balakirev and Rimsky-Korsakov to Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff.

8-mid.: NEW SINGING SENSATIONS

Ann Shaffer and Tim Snider

You’ve heard us feature the great singers of the past. Now you’ll hear some of the rising stars of today–Graham, Cura, Hvorostovsky, and many others in spectacular new recordings.

mid.-3 AM: SHOSTAKOVICH SYMPHONIES 7 & 8

Peter Elliott

Politics and music merge as Shostakovich struggles for self-expression against the need to conform to the requirements of a repressive regime.

Wed. Dec. 13:

6-10 AM: MORNING MOZART

Ralph Graves

Masterful melodies make for mellow morning musings. Three hours of Amadeus in the AM with the Radio Star.

10-noon: WAY OUT WEST

John Mitchell

The phrase still strikes a romantic chord in the American soul--and in the souls of American composers who loved and celebrated the vast spaces, rugged living, and striking beauties of the Old West. John Mitchell hits the western music trail, blazed across the American landscape by Thomson, Copland, Hanson, Roy Harris, Kern, Douglas Moore, Gottschalk, and Grofe. Saddle up and ride along.

noon-2 PM: RUSSIAN SOUL: OISTRAKH & ROSTROPOVICH

Paul Ferrer.

The names are synonymous with great fiddling. They both have technique to burn, and a big, beautiful sound, but it's the Russian soul that imbues all of their performances that makes them really special. Tune in to hear just how special.

2-4: CELEBRATION AND JUBILEE

Sheila Ann Hardaway

Throughout the centuries, English and European composers have marked state occasions with musical tributes. Join Sheila Ann Hardaway for a potpourri of inspiring as well as reverent commemoration of birth, marriage, and coronation.

4-5: BBC Newshour

5-8: PORTRAIT OF THE COMPOSER AS ARTIST

Peter Elliott and Bob Taibbi

Stravinsky, Gershwin, Rachmaninoff, Strauss, Copland, Bernstein, Granados, and Grainger were among a handful of composers who stepped in front of the microphone to record their own works. Is the composer the best interpreter of his own composition? Tune in as we enter the world of the Composer as Artist on a special edition of Portrait of the Artist.

8-mid.: COMPOSERS TO WATCH IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM

Peter Knell and Brian Malone

Having trouble keeping up with all of the new music being written? Let Peter and Brian do it for you. Tune in to hear some of the composers we think will make their mark on the first part of the 21st century.

mid.-3 AM: SHOSTAKOVICH SYMPHONIES 9 &10

Brian Malone

The Soviet Union faces crisis and potential extinction in a war to the death with Hitler’s Germany.

Thur. Dec. 14:

6-10 AM: AMERICAN BANDSTAND 1900

John Mitchell

At the turn of the last century, every town had a band, and most played "descriptive overtures"-- tone poems about picnics, circuses, battles won, and holidays celebrated. Join John for a nostalgic stroll through America 1900. Hear the music of Victor Herbert, Joplin, Sousa, MacDowell, and Charles Ives, as well as works by visiting European composers.

10-noon: SPANISH ROMANTIC PIANO COMPOSERS

Stephen Soghoian

Pianist Stephen Soghoian takes you on a magical trip to the Iberian Peninsula when he presents some of his favorite piano recordings of the works of composers Albeniz and Granados.

noon-2 PM: MARLBORO MEN AND WOMEN

The Contessa

Long-time classical music host the Contessa returns to WTJU with a program commemorating the 50th anniversary of the great chamber music festival in Vermont with music by artists identified with the festival over the years, culminating with a performance of the Schumann Piano Quintet.

2-4: AMERICAN SINGERS, AMERICAN SONG

Ann Shaffer

Our resident vocal afficionado presents some of her favorite traditional song stylists singing American song, from Stephen Foster to parlor songs.

4-5: BBC Newshour

5-8: JUST JORDI

Rita Barton

Spanish composer, teacher, musician, and conductor Jordi Saval is one of the principal figures in the performance of historical music. Through Saval’s creation of Hesperion XX and Le Concert des Nations, and in solo and ensemble performances, he has illuminated rarely performed early music. We focus on Saval's performance of instrumental music.

8-mid.: IN PRAISE OF JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

Deborah Murray

Join us as we commemorate the 250th anniversary of the death of Johann Sebastian Bach. Four glorious hours in tribute to perhaps the greatest composer of all time.

mid.-3 AM: SHOSTAKOVICH SYMPHONIES 11 & 12

Tom Bninski

Russia emerges from the war victorious, but at horrific cost. Shostakovich laments along with the whole world.

Fri. Dec. 15:

6-10 AM: EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW AGAIN

Francesca

Later composers hark back to the forms of their artistic forebears. Enjoy works such as Brahms' Variations on a Theme by Haydn, Schonberg's Kaiserwalzer, and Schnittke's Olden Sonata, presented by WTJU’s own Voice in the Morning.

10-noon: ZEPHYRUS AND PAUL WALKER

Bruce Penner

Join Paul Walker, director of the UVa Ensemble for Early Music, for a program of the vocal music of the Renaissance and early Baroque eras.  Hear selections from the new Zephyrus CD, available as a premium for your pledge of support.

noon-2 PM: CELEBRATED COLLABORATIONS

The Contessa

The Contessa recalls collaborations of musicians through the years. Hear the memorable music created by Grumiaux/Haskill, Stern/Istomin/Rose, Gould/Laredo, and many others.

2-4: POLAND, UNITED AND FREE!

Brian Malone

In this century, Poland has become one of the most fertile grounds for new music. How have Polish composers managed to find their voices in the midst of their country’s tragedies? We'll examine the ways in which Polish folk traditions, Catholicism, and World War II have influenced the works of Penderecki, Szymanowski, Gorecki, Lutoslawski, and others.

4-5: BBC Newshour

5-8: THE SILVER SWAN

Colin Bird

Colin Bird explores the sacred, secular, choral, and instrumental music of one of England's greatest composers, Orlando Gibbons.

8-10: BENJAMIN BRITTEN with Peter Knell

Benjamin Britten is widely regarded as England's greatest composer since Henry Purcell. Come hear why in a show that will feature the Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and Strings, and the Suite from “Death in Venice.”

10-mid.: THE ENGLISH PASTORALISTS

Adam Soroka

British composers have been deeply influenced by the folk traditions of their pastoral countryside. Hear that influence in the music of Vaughan Williams, Elgar, Finzi, and others.

mid.-3 AM: SHOSTAKOVICH SYMPHONY13

Derek Furr

Babiyar is one of the 20th Century’s greatest symphonic creations. It is featured with other masterpieces by Shostakovich.

Sat. Dec. 16:

6-10 AM: SONGS OF TRAVEL

Winston Barham

Classical composers have left remembrances of their voyages that can be enjoyed by everyone. From Schubert's "Winterreise" to Mendelssohn's "Scottish" Symphony to Tchaikovsky's "Souvenir de Florence." Whether you're on the go this weekend or enjoying a lazy Saturday morning, be delighted with four hours of music inspired by travel.

10-2 PM: ENGLISH ANTHEM

Michael Latsko

Join Michael Latsko in his annual presentation of the English Anthem: sublime choral gems from the British Isles sung by the world's finest choirs--something for everyone to enjoy.

2-4: AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS

Peter Elliott

On Christmas Eve 1951, the first opera ever written for television, Gian Carlo Menotti's "Amahl and the Night Visitors," had its premiere. Tune in to hear the Original Cast recording of this timeless classic. We'll also explore "Menotti on Broadway" with selections from Original Cast recordings of "The Consul," "The Telephone," and "The Medium," all of which premiered on Broadway.

4-7: THE WORLD OF RICHARD RODGERS

Peter Elliott and Eric Motschenbacher

This ALL-REQUEST three hour show features classic songs from the Broadway musicals of Rodgers & Hart (“On Your Toes,” “The Boys from Syracuse,” “Pal Joey,” “Babes in Arms”) and Rodgers & Hammerstein (“Oklahoma!,” “The King and I,” “South Pacific,” “The Sound of Music”), as well as Rodgers' ballet scores and his score for "Victory at Sea." Call in your pledge of support, and request your favorite Richard Rodgers tune.

7-9: COMPOSING A LITTLE PIANO MUSIC

Ethelbert Nevin

Piano pieces by composers who were also pianists. Included on the program are works written by Haydn, Mendelssohn, Schumann, and Chopin. Composers with early pianistic training have a more intimate knowledge of the instrument and thus an advantage when composing a little piano music.

9-mid: MUSICAL EXOTICA

Francesca

Satisfy your wanderlust and revel in the meeting of East and West as you listen to the music of western composers reflecting on the color, beauty, and strangeness of the Orient and other distant lands.

Mid.-3 AM: SHOSTAKOVICH SYMPHONIES 14 & 15

Derek Furr

Was Shostakovich a victim of the Stalinist regime or simply a collaborator? Judge for yourself and listen to the last of his great symphonies.

Sun. Dec. 17:

6-10 AM: ON YOOLIS DAY: MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE CHRISTMAS MUSIC

Tom Bninski and Deborah Murray

Step back in time and tune in to the wondrous sounds of Medieval and Renaissance Christmas music in celebration of the season.

10-noon: SPIRITUAL VOICES: THE AFRICAN AMERICAN SPIRITUAL

Shawn Felton

The spiritual has become a part of the soundscape of many 19th and 20th century music genres. The influences of this early American sacred music are widely known and admired. Our annual celebration features new recordings, expanded variety, and the masterful interpretations of Barbara Hendrix, Jessie Norman, Florence Quivar, and Marian Anderson.

noon-6 PM: TWO OTELLOS

Tim Snider

Shakespeare inspired Italy’s greatest Romantic opera composers. Hear Rossini’s and Verdi’s interpretations of Othello--or Otello–one of which has a happy ending!

6-9 PM: HANDEL’S MESSIAH

Ralph Graves and Colin Bird

The marathon concludes with WTJU’s annual tribute to Handel’s great masterpiece. This is your chance to celebrate the holiday season and make your year-end pledge to support WTJU’s classical programming in 2001.

Maintained by Philip Varner

WTJU is owned and operated by the Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia.
The opinions expressed by announcers or guests on WTJU are not necessarily the opinions of WTJU or the University of Virginia.